Author Article Year Vol Pages
Anon Dance Appreciation – Critic’s Awards 2005 24.3 pp.5-7
Archbutt, S. Understanding the Concept of the Kinesphere and its Scaffoldings 2007 26.3 pp.16-19
Archbutt, S. Understanding the Concept of the Kinesphere and its Scaffoldings 2007 26.3 pp.16-19
Archbutt, S. Choreutics Revisited and the Laban “Rings” 2008 27.1 pp.10-12
Archbutt, S. The Laban Scales and Rings (1) 2008 27.2 pp.7-11
Archbutt, S. The Laban Scales and Rings (2) 2008 27.3 pp.10-14
Archbutt, S. The Laban Scales and Rings (3) 2008 27.4 pp.19-23
Archbutt, S. The Laban Scales and Rings (4) 2009 28.1 pp.12-15
Archbutt, S. The Laban Scales and Rings (5) 2008 28.2 pp.18-21
Ashley, T. The Bartenieff Fundamentals Thigh Lift, Core integration and Contact Improvisation 2013 32.1 pp.10-12
Bagley, C. A Laban Introduction to Choreography 1998 17.1 p.15
Bagley, G. Thinking About the Kinesphere 2003 22.2 p.6
Bagley, G. The Dance of the Crystal and the Gel, part.1 2006 25.2 p.16
Bagley, G. The Dance of the Crystal and the Gel, part.2 2006 25.3 pp.18-19
Bagley, G. The Dancing Homunculus (part.3 of above) 2006 25.4 pp.14-15
Bagley, G. A Consideration of the Physical Factors Involved in the Perception of Movement 2007 26.1 pp.8-9
Bagley, G. Some Thoughts About the Three Spheres 2008 27.2 pp.12-14
Bailey, E. Flow, the Odd one Out 1998 17.1 pp.14,16
Bauer, L. Dance Composition 35
Bodmer, S. The Power of the Dance 25
Bodmer, S. Dance Composition – Part 1 28
Bodmer, S. Dance Composition – Part 2 30
Bodmer, S. Harmonics in Space 1983 71 Nov
Bodmer, W. A Scientific Approach to the Study of Movement – ‘…in the biological sciences…we start with the classifications of Linnaeus and eventually arrive at the modern theories of evolution and inheritance and their complicated mathematical justifications and predictions.  In this light I consider Laban’s work as laying the foundations of such a scientific study of human movement.’ 1958 21 pp.39-41
Bridges, D. and A. Creativity, Originality and Judgements of Value 50
Carlisle, A. Interview with Jack Bullen 2014 33.3 pp.3-4
Chapman, O Creative Dance, Some Implications of the Concept 35
Curl, G. Philosophic Foundations – Part 1 37
Curl, G. Philosophic Foundations – Part 2 38
Curl, G. Philosophic Foundations – Part 3 39
Curl, G. Philosophic Foundations – Part 4 40
Curl, G. Philosophic Foundations – Part 5 41
Curl, G. Philosophic Foundations – Part 6 43
Curl, G. The Skilful – a Major Sector of the Aesthetic 53
Curl, G. Play-acting is Pretence – how then can it be a Vehicle of Truth? 2003 22.3 p.6
Curl, G. Aesthetic Values in Community Dance 2004 23.3 pp.7-9
Curl, G. Laban’s Choreutics – Transformed and Fragmented! 2005 24.1 pp.10-13
Curl, G. Dance Criticism 2005 24.2 pp.4-6
Curl, G. Question for (past) Experts – What Makes Good Dance? 2005 24.3 pp.8-13
Curl, G. Charismatic Crystals 2006 25.1 pp.41-44
Curl, G. “Images” and “Aspects” in Dance 2008 27.1 pp.16-18
Curl, G. Keeping up Appearances in the Arts 2010 29.1 pp.4-7
Curl, G. The Critical and Appreciative Approaches to Dance in Education – Part 1 2015 34.1 pp.8-11
Curl, G. The Critical and Appreciative Approaches to Dance in Education – Part 2 2015 34.2 pp.14-16
Curl, G. Laban’s Movement Analysis 2016 35.2 pp.13-15
Curl, G. Keeping Alive the Legacy of Kurt Jooss 2017 36.2 pp.13-14
Curl, G., Longstaff, J. and Lamb, W. Critical Debate (1) 2008 27.2 pp.15-18
Curl, G., Longstaff, J. and Lamb, W. Critical Debate (2) 2008 27.3 pp.19-20
Curl, G., Longstaff, J. and Lamb, W. Critical Debate (3) 2008 27.4 pp.24-25
Curtis-Jones, A. Transmission: Re-Imagining Laban, Contemporising the Past, Envisioning the Future 2016 35.1 pp.12-16
Davies, K., Fowler, J., McCaw, D., & Roberts, H. The Laban Archives – Bedford, NRCD, Trinity Laban and Brotherton 2015 34.1 pp.15-17
Dewey, M. The Significance of Movement 29
Douse, L. Flow: the psychology of intrinsic motivation 2015 34.3 pp.4-6
Doyle, B. The Important Dynamics of our Dance Group; and some of the issues it raises 1980 64 May
Erdorf, S. (translated by Gerard Bagley) The Oil of Movement is the Flow 1996 15.2 p.8
Foster, R. The Analysis of Movement – a Current Conception and Reasons for it 25
Glockner, S. A Short Introduction to the Bartenieff Movement 2000 19.4 pp.10-11
Henshaw, D. Eukinetics 1996 15.3 pp.4-5
Hermelin, W. Time and no Time 2000 19.3 p.15
Holbrook, J. Laban, Wagner and the Gesamtkunstwerk 1983 70 May
Hutchinson-Guest, A. The Language of Dance Centre 1992 11.4 p.1
Hutchinson-Guest, A. In Question – the Body 1996 15.1 pp.1,3
Hutchinson-Guest, A. Space Dance. Twelve Choreutic Dance Studies 1997 16.2 pp.8-9
Hutchinson-Guest, A. Essential Meanings 2009 28.2 p.9
Johnston, S. Flow of Energy, Birth to Maturity 1989 78 May
Kennedy, A. EUROLAB Certificate Programs in Laban/Bartenieff Movement Studies 2016 35.2 p.28
Kennedy, A. Spiral Didactics – Revisiting Modern Educational Dance 2018 37.1 pp.8-10
Kennedy, D. What is Dance – ‘Dance is not only an art, but is the taproot of all art.  …From this root art have sprung music, drama, painting and decoration, etc., daughter arts which are still compounded with Mother-dance in the service of tribal magic, ceremony and religion.’ 1951 6 pp.12-17
Kirsten, J. My Series for L 2013 32.1 pp.4-7
Lange, R. Philosophic Foundations and Laban’s Theory of Movement 43
Lange, R. The Nature of Dance 44
Lamb, W. Movement as a Common Denominator 1998 17.2 p.3
Leaman, O. Thinking Philosophically About Dance 1998 17.2 p.3
Leonard, M. Rhythm and Dance – Part 1 – ‘Today, man may choose to eel that his primitive ancestry is far behind him, yet there are few who do not respond in some way to the deep resonant beat of a drum, and in doing so realise that within themselves are unexpected depths, primitive forces not beyond recall.’ 1954 12 pp.29-33
Leonard, M. Rhythm and Dance – Part 2 – ‘Differences in the use of rhythm characterise opposing racial temperament, and the contrast provided between the drumming of India and Africa clearly illustrates this.’ 1954 13 pp.56-61
Leonard, M. Rhythm and Dance – Part 3 – ‘Musically Man has gained much, but also lost a great deal and the value of musical research into primitive, oriental and folk traditions, is that it serves to widen our horizons.’ 1955 14 pp.36-43
Leonard, M. Rhythm and Dance – Part 4 – ‘Freedom and metricity in rhythm are two opposite poles between which stands a whole range of intermediary stages.  A rhythm may change from one to the other abruptly, or maybe transformed by degrees.’ 1956 17 pp.45-51
Leonard, M. Rhythm and Dance 47
Lewis, H. Relationships – through Dancing together we
Learn
1996 15.4 pp.1,12
Maletic, V. Laban Concepts and Laban Dialects in Shape 1988 77 May
Meredith-Jones, B. Moving and Living 27
McCaw, D. The Genius of Geraldine Stephenson 2009 28.1 pp.1-4
McCaw, D. Working in the John Hodgson Archive 2013 33.3 pp.12-13
Millar, B. Polyhedron 2019 38.3 p.9
North, M. Effort Study 1996 15.3 p.1
North, M. Dimensions of Laban’s Contribution to Movement Analysis 2012 30.2 pp.6-8
Nugent, A. Letter re. William Forsythe 2004 23.4 p.3
Nugent, A. Swimming Upside Down; William Forsythe and Rudolf Laban 2010 29.1 pp.1-3
Perrotet, C. Thoughts about Dance and Dance Technique 39
Perrotet, C. Learning Dance Studies in the context of Choreutics 1998 17.3 pp.4-5,14
Platt, M. Movement can say More 1998 17.3 pp.1,6
Poulter, B. Moving and being moved: Laban Movement Analysis in Dance Movement Psychotherapy 2018 37.3 pp.6-8
Preston-Dunlop, V. Going for a Walk with a Line 1982 69 May
Preston-Dunlop, V. Choreological Studies 1988 77 May
Preston-Dunlop, V. Laban’s Kammertanzbuhne Revisited 1988 77 May
Preston-Dunlop, V. Laban, Space and Choreutics 1996 15.2 pp.1,3
Preston-Dunlop, V. Laban and Choreological Studies 1926 – 2001 2001 20.1 pp.4-7
Preston-Dunlop, V. Letter – Connections between Dance and Drama in Laban’s work 2003 22.3 p.3
Preston-Dunlop, V. Icosohedra and All That 2004 23.3 p.13
Preston-Dunlop, V. Icosohedra and All That 2004 23.4 p.6
Preston-Dunlop, V. Laban’s Choreutic Practice 2006 Supp p.12
Preston-Dunlop, V. Contemporary Engagement with the Past – Ascona address 2014 33.1 pp.4-6
Rosewarne-Jenkins, M.A. Exploration of Aspects of Rhythm 39
Royston, R. “In these Dramatic Times…” how to use the Laban Approach to activate Online Dimensions 2020 39.2 pp.3-8
Salter, A. Icosahedral Symmetry Operations 39
Salter, A. Notes on Effort 44
Salter, A. Movement and Mind 1984 73 Nov
Salter, A. Choreutics: A Rational Structuring 2008 27.1 pp.12-15
Salter, A. Practical Aesthetics from Movement to Art 2009 28.2 pp.15-17
Salter, A. Existentialism, Aesthetics, Dance 2011 30.1 p.11
Skelly, M. Developmental Possibilities – Part 1 60
Skelly, M. Developmental Possibilities – Part 2 61
Skelly, M. Developmental Possibilities – Part 3 62
Stephenson, G. A Laban Approach to Performance 1994 13.2 pp.1,5
Stuiber, B. Archetypes of Movement 2009 28.1 pp.7-9
Tolley, J. Effort Analysis and The Tempest 1982 69 Nov
Turner, J. Is Dance Science? 2002 21.1 pp.6-7
Ullmann, L. Space Harmony – Part 1 The Dimensional Scale – ‘The six movements of this scale are not arbitrary, but evolve naturally from the study of the physical and mental functions of the human being.’ 1952 9 pp.16-19
Ullmann, L. Space Harmony – Part 2 The Diagonal Scale – ‘In the diagonal scale we see how the three dimensions or six dimensional directions of up-down, left-right and backward-forward eliminate one another.  The centre of gravity which had its static security is now flung or dragged into a direction which may be high-right-forward at the same time.’ 1953 10 pp.30-32
Ullmann, L. Space Harmony – Part 3 – ‘The dimensional movements which tend to establish positions on the one hand, and on the other, to continue the motion into one dimensional direction only at a time, require a stable balance of the centre of gravity either vertically above the stance or its pull out of this situation into the stress direction.’ 1953 11 pp.23-26
Ullmann, L. Space Harmony – Part 4 – ‘Now I should like to consider further such movements which avoid a central pathway and which circle around the core of the body.’ 1954 12 pp.26-29
Ullmann, L. Space Harmony – Part 5 – ‘I would suggest that when one moves in a definite direction, space and its harmony or the east move in it with winding, circling gestures is entirely forgotten.’ 1955 14 p.33-36
Ullmann, L. Space Harmony – Part 6 – ‘There are the three structural factors to be considered: (a) The right-left symmetry of the body; (b) The spine, bending forward and backward; (c) The division of the upper and lower part of the body.’ 1955 15 pp.29-34
Ullmann, L. Space Harmony – Part 7 – ‘Movement evolves in space.  There is no end to the variety of possible motions but in the various situations of man’s life selections are made according to inner preparedness and outer  opportunity for action.’ 1957 18 pp.23-27
Wigman, M. The Extraordinary Thing Laban Gave to the Dance 51